How Bob's Wild Horse Tours started

Bob’s Wild Horse Tours started as an accident back in 1996. My dad, Bob Sr., owned the Inn at Corolla Light, he was drinking margaritas on the pool deck with some guests as they inquired about the horses and how to see them. My dad, being the customer service guy, said he had a 4-wheel-drive vehicle and would take them on the beach to see the horses.

At some point someone said, “You should offer horse tours! This is great!” Then the crew decided on a name for the business. You may have guessed it — Bob’s Wild Horse Adventure Tours. Actually I think it was more like Wild Bob’s Wild Horse Adventure Tours. There may have been some margaritas consumed on the trip by the passengers.

Now, for the rest of the story. Bob suggested that I should start up horse tours; he was busy with the Inn. So I became the Bob. Allow me to introduce myself. I am Bob White Jr. I am actually a third, but Jr. is easier when people are looking for either of us.

Over the years the company has grown with the area. We went from one rusty old Suburban to five to to open air safari trucks. I have also been featured on North Carolina Weekend, a show that showcases things to do in the state.

In an effort to keep things fresh and offer a better horse tour, we’ve built three open-air trucks to take our guests out in. They offer a much better trip, in my view. After all, you came to see the beach and smell that salt air. Our new vehicles seats up to 15 people, with seats in the cab that offer air conditioning if you so desire.

I hope that you will give us a try. Bob’s Wild Horse Tours are designed for families and will provide you with memories to share for years to come.

 

Sincerely,

Bob White


The history of Corolla wild horses

The horses have a long history dating back to the first explorers of the country. The Corolla Wild Horse Fund has done a great job of cataloging and detailing that history. I urge you to go to the site www.corollawildhorses.com. There you can read the complete history of the banker horses. I cannot even begin to outdo them, so why try.

The Corolla Horse Fund is run by a great group of individuals and volunteers who oversee the herd. Please take the time to view their site and to get involved if you can. If you are in the area, stop by their store at The Corolla Light Town Center or the office in the Historic Corolla Village. Every little bit helps, and they need it. I cannot begin to thank them for all the hard work they put in that helps keep me in business and keeps the horses strong and viable.

Currituck County has gone to great lengths to protect the horses. Below are a few of the laws you must be aware of should you see the horses. If the horses get fed the wrong thing, it could kill them! If they become too tame, they will be removed from the island. So please respect them and give them room. It will allow future generations to enjoy them.


Luring, enticing, seizing

It shall be unlawful for any person to lure or entice a wild horse out of a wild horse sanctuary, or to seize and remove a wild horse from a wild horse sanctuary, except for the purpose of treatment under the care and supervision of a licensed veterinarian or to remove a shunned colt from a wild horse sanctuary when the shunned colt is certified by the animal control officer to be a nuisance or dangerous to persons or property. It shall further be unlawful for any person to lure, attract, or entice a wild horse to come within 50 feet of any person.


Feeding, riding and petting wild horses prohibited

It shall be unlawful for any person to feed, ride, pet or approach with the intent to feed, ride or pet any wild horse.